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Judgments of effort exerted by others are influenced by received rewards

dc.contributor.authorRollwage, Max
dc.contributor.authorPannach, Franziska
dc.contributor.authorStinson, Caedyn
dc.contributor.authorToelch, Ulf
dc.contributor.authorKagan, Igor
dc.contributor.authorPooresmaeili, Arezoo
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-29T12:29:22Z
dc.date.available2020-05-29T12:29:22Z
dc.date.issued2020de
dc.identifier.urihttp://resolver.sub.uni-goettingen.de/purl?gs-1/17354
dc.description.abstractEstimating invested effort is a core dimension for evaluating own and others’ actions, and views on the relationship between effort and rewards are deeply ingrained in various societal attitudes. Internal representations of effort, however, are inherently noisy, e.g. due to the variability of sensorimotor and visceral responses to physical exertion. The uncertainty in effort judgments is further aggravated when there is no direct access to the internal representations of exertion – such as when estimating the effort of another person. Bayesian cue integration suggests that this uncertainty can be resolved by incorporating additional cues that are predictive of effort, e.g. received rewards. We hypothesized that judgments about the effort spent on a task will be influenced by the magnitude of received rewards. Additionally, we surmised that such influence might further depend on individual beliefs regarding the relationship between hard work and prosperity, as exemplified by a conservative work ethic. To test these predictions, participants performed an effortful task interleaved with a partner and were informed about the obtained reward before rating either their own or the partner’s effort. We show that higher rewards led to higher estimations of exerted effort in self-judgments, and this effect was even more pronounced for other-judgments. In both types of judgment, computational modelling revealed that reward information and sensorimotor markers of exertion were combined in a Bayes-optimal manner in order to reduce uncertainty. Remarkably, the extent to which rewards influenced effort judgments was associated with conservative world-views, indicating links between this phenomenon and general beliefs about the relationship between effort and earnings in society.de
dc.language.isoengde
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/716846/EU//RewardedPerceptionde
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rightsNamensnennung 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCooperation; Social behaviourde
dc.subject.ddc612
dc.titleJudgments of effort exerted by others are influenced by received rewardsde
dc.typejournalArticlede
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-020-58686-0
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionde
dc.relation.eISSN2045-2322
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume10de
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue1de
dc.bibliographicCitation.firstPage1de
dc.bibliographicCitation.lastPage14de
dc.type.subtypejournalArticle
dc.bibliographicCitation.articlenumber1868de
dc.description.statuspeerReviewedde
dc.bibliographicCitation.journalScientific Reportsde


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